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Room for optimism in airport recommendations - The Tennessean

By MARILYN ROBINSON

Published: Tuesday, 10/16/07

The Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority's plan for race- and gender-based goals for awarding contracts is very promising. Rodney Strong of Griffin & Strong, PC, the consultant that conducted the disparity study, noted major deficiencies and corrective recommendations that are on point.

Read more: Room for optimism in airport recommendations - The Tennessean

Airport has long way to go on its minority contracts - The Tennessean

Nashville airport officials should certainly understand why people might be skeptical of their efforts as they address participation levels of minority-owned and female-owned businesses in contracts.

Studies released this year show that only 8 percent of contracts awarded by Metro agencies and the airport have gone to minorities in the last seven years. The airport is striving to have a fair system, and airport officials need to know they will win favor with many people in this region if they show inclusiveness in awarding contracts. It is good to see their attention to the issue. But the matter is not limited to the airport, and Mayor Karl Dean's announcement early in his term of trying to address the city's record on the issue should be a plus.

Read more: Airport has long way to go on its minority contracts - The Tennessean

Airport wants to be a model of inclusion - The Tennessean

By RAUL REGALADO

Published: Tuesday, 10/16/07

Nine months ago, the Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority embarked on a disparity study.
The Authority hired the Atlanta-based firm of Griffin & Strong, and asked it to look for ways to broaden and strengthen its existing efforts to build partnerships with small, minority and women-owned businesses.

Read more: Airport wants to be a model of inclusion - The Tennessean

Fairness must dictate change on contracts - The Tennessean

According to a recent study, people of color and white women face "extraordinary, perhaps discriminatory'' barriers to landing business contracts with Metro agencies. Despite owning one-fourth of all businesses that bid on projects from 1999-2003, women and minorities received only 8 percent of contract dollars. The other 92 percent went to firms owned by white men.

Read more: Fairness must dictate change on contracts - The Tennessean